IMGP7138.JPG

From the Principal

12.04.18

It has been a busy term, full of many events, learning opportunities and achievements. In this final week of Term 1, I would like to thank everyone who has worked so hard to make this term so successful. I look forward to seeing everyone with renewed energy and vigour next term.

Helen Steele, Cathy Swain and Lauren Sutton will be travelling to Hobart at the end of the week and presenting at the Leading, Learning and Caring Conference. The presentation has a focus on wellbeing, particularly the Connected, Resilient, Optimistic, Persistent and Self-assured (CROPS) initiative from our Wellbeing Ambassadors.

At the end of this term, we farewell Miescha Archibald and wish her well for the arrival for her baby and Sharon Howson who is taking some extended leave and travelling to Europe with her husband.

In Term 2, we will welcome Alicia Fitton who will work in the Home Economics area and Paul Bartley who will be our replacement Laboratory Assistant.

We are pleased that Martina O’ Connell will stay with us and take on the Year 10 Pastoral Care Coordinator role for the rest of the year.

During the term break, I will be attending the Australian Schools Women’s Leadership Summit in Sydney and hope to catch up with my reading list. The list of books to read seems longer than ever! I am currently reading Enough as she is by Rachel Simmons and while this text is based on the American experience of trying to achieve the right score to get into a particular college, there are some salient lessons for us here in Australia. Simmons asserts, “Girls grew up hearing they could be anything, but heard they have to be everything” and now are putting impossible demands on themselves.

Two things to take from this book are as follows. First, we should focus on learning goals as well as achievement goals. For example, focus on not just an A on the Maths test but also to be competent at solving simultaneous equations. The second thing has come from a Buddhist psychologist, Tara Brach, who uses the “I love” exercise. In this exercise, sit with your daughter, using a timer and for one-minute straight say everything that comes to mind that you love. For example, “I love chocolate, I love reading…”, and then switch. Try this with other family and friends. Talk about the things you value and enjoy doing. How can you incorporate doing more things you love into your life?

And on that note, have a wonderful break!

 

Kath McGuigan
Principal